All posts tagged: thessaloniki

Bougatsa

How to impress a foodie: serve them BOUGATSA creaminess. How to impress a history buff: serve them bougatsa knowledge. Both the history buff and the foodie will wonder where bougatsa have been their whole lives. They say bougatsa originated in Serres, a city north of Thessalonaki where many Greeks immigrated during the Greco-Turkish war that ended in 1922. Making phyllo-wrapped pies and desserts was nothing particularly new, but the sweet pies in this region—filled with thick, rich cream—became a hit. The immigrants in Thessaloniki couldn’t get enough of the affordable, tasty treats. So, what makes bougatsa so delicious? Creamy semolina custard or soft mizithra cheese, topped with cinnamon and sugar. To taste the best mizithra cheese version, go to Crete. Visit Chania, if you can, sit in the historic limani (port) area, order one or two or three bougatsa and thank me later. And send me one while you’re at it. At home, I make my bougatsa with the semolina filling because quality mizithra is hard to find. Plus, it’s easy to make, not too …

Bouyiourdi (Spicy Baked Feta)

These are a few of my favorite things: Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens, bright copper kettles, and warm woolen mittens. In fact, while I’m actually not much of kitten or mitten enthusiast, I do enjoy simple pleasures like peeling an orange in one long piece, finding a missing match to my favorite socks, and receiving snail mail while simultaneously clicking “unsubscribe” from annoying email lists. But perhaps my very favorite thing is eating scrumptious dishes that are easy to create. BOUYIOURDI puts the E in easy and will stand out in any dinner spread. This popular Greek meze comes from Thessaloniki, a cosmopolitan seaside city in Northern Greece, and gives me yet another reason to visit one of my favorite Greek cities. Thessaloniki lies where Europe meets Asia, and where, as a result, many taste influences converge, dating back to the time of Alexander the Great. Alexander’s half-sister, Thessalonike, gave the city its name. It is not known if they ate bouyiourdi. The best thing about bouyiourdi (boo-your-THEE) is that it hardly even …