All posts tagged: greekrecipe

The Ouzito: Greek Ouzo Mojito

To many people, mojitos represent the epitome of a refreshing cocktail. They’re light, slightly sweet, and especially enjoyable on a warm day. Better yet, it calls for the mix and shake of just a handful of ingredients: sugar, mint, lime juice, club soda, and rum. To put a Greek spin on the classic cocktail, simply substitute the rum with your favorite brand of ouzo and you have yourself an ouzo Mojito—an “ouzito.” The drink is equally as irresistible as the original. Ingredients: 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, or simple syrup 7 mint leaves, plus more for garnish 1 oz. fresh lime juice 2 oz. ouzo 1 cup ice 2 oz. club soda Directions: 1. In a shaker, add the sugar, lime juice and mint. Gently muddle together. 2. Add the ouzo and ice and shake well. Pour (unstrained) into a high glass. Top with club soda. 3. Garnish with a sprig of mint and lime slices. Notes: This recipe is made for one serving, but feel free to adjust it accordingly and make a pitcher to …

Makaronia me Kima (Spaghetti with meat sauce)

Whether you’re a novice or an expert cook, or somewhere in between, you’ll want to add MAKARONIA ME KIMA to your repertoire. At very least you should know how to make the latter portion, the kima. In Greek, kima means minced, and in this case the word implies the minced or ground beef sauce. The kima alone will win friends and influence eaters. After all, once you have that special meat sauce, you can serve it like chili, pile between bread slices for sloppy joes, eat it plain, or serve it hot as we Greeks do over a bed of makaronia (any style of your favorable pasta). My favorite is the long noodle variety often used in pastitsio. With makaronia me kima (mah-kah-ROH-neea meh kee-MAH) the meat sauce pretty much prepares itself once the ingredients begin simmering in the pot. How I love a practically effortless meal! All that’s left to do is boil your pasta and grate some flavorful cheese to top it off. Mizithra, Kefalotyri, or Parmesan cheese are standard. Don’t be stingy …

Tyrokafteri (Spicy cheese dip)

It doesn’t matter where I eat, my eyes always race down the menu for any mention of something spicy. Spicy curry? Yes please, with a side of naan. Buffalo chicken wings? My hands and face will definitely be a hot mess after but I’ll take a basket full of those. Bahn mi sandwich and a bowl of pho? Neither typically packs enough heat for my liking—until a side of jalapenos and hot sauce fix my dilemma. Whatever the menu offers, if it says spicy or has the potential for spice, nine times out of ten I’ll order it. Finding something spicy to eat at a Greek taverna isn’t easy. The decision is pretty much made for you because there are few items on a standard Greek menu that have my kind of kick. One is spetzofai a delicious pepper and sausage dish. Another is TYROKAFTERI (tee-roh-kaf-teh-REE) basically meaning “hot cheese.” And no, it’s not literal hot cheese like the popular saganaki, the pan-seared cheese that is brought to tableside all aflame. This hot cheese makes …

The Greek Frappe

Water used to be the only fluid I needed to get me through the day. Then I went to Ionian Village and realized I needed something stronger than water. I needed a Greek FRAPPE. All day, every day. Ionian Village, a summer camp in Bartholomio, Greece, brings together over 40 staff members and hundreds of teen campers from across the United States, giving them an experience of a lifetime. Ionian Village strengthens faith, teaches Greek culture, creates epic memories, and even supplies coffee. I was a camper in 2008 and a staff member in back-to-back summers of 2013 and 2014. Serving as a staff member gave me the best experiences of all. It’s also when I drank the most frappes in my life. Staff members work two 20-day sessions from June to August. We cranked through lots of late nights and early mornings because it’s always on-the-go time. You can’t really call it work because eating Kyria Sophia’s delicious Greek food and supervising junkyard wars, music fests, and themed dance parties totally rocks. On travel …

Melitzanosalata (Eggplant Salad)

There are a few things you should know about melitzanosalata. First, it’s a mouthful to pronounce, as I’m sure you’ve already noticed. (It’s pronounced meh-lee-tza-no-sah-LAH-ta). Second, although melitzanosalata translates into “eggplant salad” it can also pass as a dip or a spread. Finally, melitzanosalata is not only simple to make, it’s healthy, too. Melitzanosalata is an effortless dish with very few ingredients. The main ingredient is, of course, the melitzana (eggplant). Typically, the eggplant (I prefer the big round variety) is charred over a flame to create that smokiness that’s characteristic of melitzanosalata. You can also bake the eggplant in the oven to achieve a similar result, but if you want that true smoky taste—fire up the grill. Like the majority of Greek dishes, garlic is key to making melitzanosalata. It shouldn’t be too overpowering, but should still produce enough kick to let you (and people around you) know it’s there. Extra virgin olive oil, lemon juice, and fresh parsley are also added to the mix. Some recipes may stop there—but this melitzanosalata recipe calls …

Fava (Yellow Split Pea Puree)

Santorini is known as the beautiful Greek island with white-washed homes, marbled streets, blue domes and dazzling views. Situated perfectly in the Aegean Sea, it boasts some of the most breathtaking sunsets in the world. Santorini is a must visit. Besides the stunning beauty, Santorini is famous for producing the best yellow split peas in Greece. Tavernas all over the island use those split peas to create an island favorite—FAVA. Do not confuse this dish with fava beans. However fava (FAH-va) got its name, it’s a simple puree of yellow split peas, onions, olive oil and herbs, and is a well-known Greek meze. You can serve this filling dip creamy (by using a blender) or chunky (served directly from the pot) depending on your liking. To give extra flair and flavor, serve your fava with a variety of side garnishes, such as diced red onions, feta cheese, capers, chopped parsley, Kalamata olives, sun-dried tomatoes, or anchovies. Fava goes great when dipped with crusty bread, or when eaten plain as a side dish. Smooth, warm, delicious, …