All posts tagged: easyrecipe

Greek Spaghetti

Twirling long strands of spaghetti around a fork is one of my guilty pleasures. Every time I eat a plate of spaghetti, no matter where or why, I get some sweet “guilt” satisfaction. It’s an added bonus when the spaghetti has been prepared with a guilt inducing creamy garlic butter sauce and covered with two of my favorite types of cheese, grated mizithra and crumbled feta. Freshly diced tomatoes—my super secret guilty pleasure—round out the flavor of this simple dish, and the twirling begins. It doesn’t take much to create your own GREEK SPAGHETTI, the only difficult part comes from trying to figure out the correct amount of spaghetti to boil. Do you boil eight ounces or maybe you count out 157 strands of spaghetti? Sometimes the best answer is to boil an entire package of your favorite pasta—fettuccine, linguine, angel hair, whatever—just boil it all. No matter your measuring method, there always seems to be too much as a result. But that’s what friends with appetites are for. Invite your buddies over and indulge …

Grilled Cilantro Lime Chicken

When I think of grilling, my mind is drawn to the classic burger and hot dog. But there’s an endless variety of what should be thrown on the grill—chicken, shrimp, ribs, fruits and vegetables. Chicken is my favorite thing to grill, as it’s versatile and combines well with creative seasonings and sauces. Before grilling, I marinate the meat for several hours using robust flavors that are often enhanced on the grill. My marinade for this grilled chicken recipe has a zesty lime with cilantro, garlic, oil and honey. Optional add-ins are chili flakes for pop and a shot of tequila for fun—that tenderizes the chicken even more. Sliced avocados and cabbage salad on the side are just what’s needed for a lovely presentation. And if you have any leftovers, dice up the chicken to use in tacos. Save Print Grilled Cilantro Lime Chicken Recipe type: Main Course Serves: 3-4   Zesty Lime Grilled Chicken. Ingredients 3 lbs skinless boneless chicken breasts or thighs 4 limes, zested and juiced ½ cup honey ½ cup extra virgin olive oil …

Skordalia (Garlic Dip)

Nothing will keep your friends, family, and even strangers at an arms length away (or further) from you than taking just one bite of skordalia (garlic dip). Any bites after that and you can guarantee to be quarantined. No wonder it’s my favorite dip. I’m a people person, but a no touchy-touchy in my personal space type of people person. So, I like to keep some skordalia handy. Skordalia is a dip defined by the skorda (garlic). And we’re talking lots of garlic. Traditionally, skordalia is puréed with potatoes as the base, but it can also be made with bread, nuts, or both to add a little more texture. The potato version has a smooth consistency and is basically like super garlicky mashed potatoes. My version of skordalia foregoes the potatoes and uses bread and walnuts as the base. It’s a method I’ve always preferred. For one, you cut the cooking time it takes to boil and mash the potatoes. And two, it’s all about the garlic anyway. Did I mention there’s a lot of …

Avgolemono Soup (Egg Lemon Soup)

Greeks have a fix for every ailment. And no, it’s not Windex as seen in My Big Fat Greek Wedding. But if you do have an itch to spray some Windex on something, feel free to aim your spray bottle towards the direction of my windows because half the time I can’t even see out. What Greeks actually use for home remedies and cures are lots of herbs, vegetables, and juices. For example, to fight the common cold, they brew a hot cup of tsai tou vounou (Greek mountain tea). Sprigs of mint are used to prevent an unsettled stomach or used as an aromatherapy for migraine relief. In the frigid winter months, a big bowl of avgolemono soup is a popular cure all. Avgolemono soup is like the Michael Jordan of Greek food—definitely in the starting five of all-star Greek dishes. Lucky for you, it’s not hard to find. You probably know someone who makes this traditional Greek soup, and if not, you can drop in to a nearby Greek restaurant to sample their …

Makaronia me Kima (Spaghetti with meat sauce)

Whether you’re a novice or an expert cook, or somewhere in between, you’ll want to add MAKARONIA ME KIMA to your repertoire. At very least you should know how to make the latter portion, the kima. In Greek, kima means minced, and in this case the word implies the minced or ground beef sauce. The kima alone will win friends and influence eaters. After all, once you have that special meat sauce, you can serve it like chili, pile between bread slices for sloppy joes, eat it plain, or serve it hot as we Greeks do over a bed of makaronia (any style of your favorable pasta). My favorite is the long noodle variety often used in pastitsio. With makaronia me kima (mah-kah-ROH-neea meh kee-MAH) the meat sauce pretty much prepares itself once the ingredients begin simmering in the pot. How I love a practically effortless meal! All that’s left to do is boil your pasta and grate some flavorful cheese to top it off. Mizithra, Kefalotyri, or Parmesan cheese are standard. Don’t be stingy …

Pan-fried olives

Olives are among the oldest foodstuffs in the world and Greeks have cherished this giving fruit on their dinner tables for centuries. A simple drizzle of olive oil and a generous sprinkle of oregano on top of a bowlful of green or black olives make for easy table finger food. Olives of nearly every variety, especially the famous Kalamata olive, always compliment the horiatiki salata (Greek village salad) and are a great addition to pasta salads or cooked into baked chicken dishes. Simple can be so beautiful. In my Greek home, a warm plate of PAN-FRIED OLIVES is often resembles a work of art. My dad discovered this appetizer years ago in one of his many cookbooks, and since then he has modified it to his own liking, mostly by just adding different olive and onion types. You can prepare it with any combination of the olives you see here, by adding your own favorites, or by just using a single olive variety. My favorite are the wrinkled Moroccan or Greek thrombes olives and I often use them alone. …

Greek Orzo Salad

There’s nothing more refreshing than the Greek village salad: crisp cucumbers, tasty tomatoes, colorful peppers, chopped onions, and Kalamata olives, all drizzled with olive oil, then topped with oregano and feta cheese. With the same ingredients (and any add-ons you desire), you can make that same salad a little more filling by adding orzo (manestra) to the mix. The Greek orzo salad becomes a memorable and flavorful meal. It’s easy to make. Just chop the vegetables smaller than you would for a regular Greek village salad, boil the orzo, then season, dress and toss. And go colorful with the vegetables because this dish can look like an artistic masterpiece with the right combinations. For example, I add cherry and golden tomatoes along with red, yellow, and orange mini peppers to create extra pops of color that are not only appealing to the eye, but the palette as well. Play around with what you like and make a Greek orzo salad masterpiece of your own. Just be sure to make plenty of it, because trust me—it will …